8.8.15

Hug a Muslim?


I want to vomit all over this. A man stood in a public space in Mumbai with a blindfold, his arms stretched out. The placard near him read:

"I'm Muslim and I trust you. Do you trust me enough for a hug?"

This is utter nonsense. It is one thing if such pantomimes are forced upon immigrants in the West, but why must Muslims behave as though they are dependent on the hospitality and large-heartedness of a benefactor state or community? They are a natural part of the country, and don't have to prove anything to anybody.

Such temporary drama helps no one and in fact has a deleterious effect on the onlookers because the huggers will most likely be those who are anyway quite comfortable in a pluralistic ethos. Now suddenly, after becoming more public via the media and Internet, they will begin to view their act as some sort of charity, a doling out of trust.

This is the sort of beggary that justifies majoritarianism. And it does not surprise me that the liberals are calling this a wonderful story, given their penchant for the cute varnish, and the fact that their business thrives because they are the precedent that forms the template of such charitable concern for the minority. Remember the 'put the hand on the shoulder of the Muslim man in front of the Taj Hotel' act after the 26/11 attack by a star anchor? That man was just somebody who had gathered there, perhaps in a show of support against terrorism (another mandatory gig for Muslims). The impression it gave was that in some ways all Muslims will or should feel guilty. Unless of course the saviour says otherwise and legitimises them.

It is time Muslims stopped playing into this devious lot's game-plan of swooping down on just such acts.

If people mistrust you, then honestly they have to bear the onus of suspicion for it arises not from reason but fear of imagined demons. And you can't conquer that for them. 

7 comments:

  1. I wonder when we will see a "I converted out of Islam. Do you want to hug me?" gig. Preferably in an Islamic country.

    Hopefully soon. As soon as the first person to be still alive after conversion shows up, I guess.

    Those who eat halaal food presumably won't vomit.

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    1. All that you've said has nothing to do with what I said, but keep at it...

      Delete
  2. Hmmm. I don't know, Farzana. To me, these guys look like they *want* to give him a hug, but have had second thoughts for some reason. Check out the guy in purple on the far left. His hands are positioned as if ready to hug -- but observe the action of his fingers on his right hand. I myself do this when I'm uncertain about what I'm going to be reaching for. He's also examining the *sign* quite carefully and not the gentleman requesting his hug. Check out the young man in the black shirt: He seems to have wanted to give the fellow a hug; but the older, perhaps wiser fellow in black trousers and white shirt appears to have cautioned him. I want to say their skepticism arises not from the gentleman's desire for a hug but from his claim to be a Muslim. He could be anything -- a dalit, even.

    M.

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    1. {but the older, perhaps wiser fellow in black trousers and white shirt appears to have cautioned him}

      How does that make him wiser?

      { their skepticism arises not from the gentleman's desire for a hug but from his claim to be a Muslim. He could be anything -- a dalit, even}

      That is precisely the problem...we are willing to give a hug to the familiar within our safe zones.

      My point, however, is that gestures obfuscate.

      PS: Do you imagine they'd be thinking about halaal food?

      Delete
  3. it happened in toronto this feb , https://youtu.be/8XF7XM7Q0bM and I remember there was a god woman who was popularly known as "Amma" ( amma.org) in New york who would listen to your problems and in the end she would give a free hug and all the problems would get solved etc .
    These things have been happening for years , and I ain't surprised one bit!

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  4. But this is not about a godwoman/man giving blessings with a hug; this is about how common people feel the need to be accepted.

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  5. >>My point, however, is that gestures obfuscate.<<

    Indeed it was, Farzana. My apologies.

    >>How does that make him wiser?<<

    I doesn't -- not necessarily -- hence my "perhaps wiser fellow." If anything, it's his moustache that makes him look wise. :)

    >>PS: Do you imagine they'd be thinking about halaal food?<<

    Well . . . no, it wasn't exactly the first thing that came to mind (sorry Footloose). Whilst reading your post, the first thing that came to mind was that such gestures obfuscate that Muslims, as you note, "are a natural part of the country, and don't have to prove anything to anybody." Overt (and covert) suggestions to the contrary can be wearisome and nauseating.

    M.

    Ps. I will say that, while viewing Rizwan's contribution, I got the distinct impression that some of the folk doing the hugging weren't so much communicating their trust to the ostensible Muslim (as you further note, "the huggers will most likely be those who are anyway quite comfortable in a pluralistic ethos"), as they may have been communicating . . . well, *something* to their perhaps less than comfortable neighbors. Hard to be sure.

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